THANK YOU ATTENDEES & SPEAKERS!

 November 8-9, 2019   •   Washington Marriott at Metro Center

Keynote Speaker

Amy J. Ross, NASA

This years keynote speaker will be Amy J. Ross. She proudly leads the Advanced Space Suit Pressure Garment development team at NASA Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center. Currently, her team is designing a suit of the future for demonstration on the International Space Station.

We design for users. We design for devices. We design for capabilities.

How do you navigate among these three? Join the inaugural DCUX Conference to explore how experience design connects the who, what, and where for products, services, and communities.

Design for People

Designing for our human users is varied and complex. How can we ensure broad inclusion for specific audiences, accessibility or special needs, multiple languages, voice, and more?

Design for Places

New technologies enable new capabilities for designing location-enabled devices and experiences at specific locations. Wearable computers, touch-screens, kiosks, sensors – how can we create experiences for an increasingly mobile audience?

Design for Things

Our physical and digital lives are increasingly connected and intertwined. AI-driven Internet of Things sensors, web-enabled devices, voice UIs, and much more. How can these come together to enable more inclusive next generation experiences?

PROGRAM

Full list of presenters and topics now available!

Registration

Learn How to Lead a Design Sprint… by Participating in a Design Sprint

One of the hottest techniques in UX today is the 4-5 day design sprint, used to answer “critical business questions through design, prototyping, and testing ideas with customers” (source: http://www.gv.com/sprint/). Sprints can help launch a startup, assist existing organizations work through difficult problems, or be useful to anyone with an idea worth exploring. But design sprints don’t have to be 5 days — they can be done in as little as a few hours and still be a useful tool, as we will see in this workshop. Participants will learn all about design sprints by doing shortened versions of several activities that are core to the experience. This will be mixed with presentations on the basics of how to facilitate a successful sprint, and how organizations can incorporate them for learning. Thus participants will both learn by doing and be able to absorb the presentations in easily digestible chunks. The activities will all be conducted around a case study, with participants given a full scenario and enough background material to be successful. We’ll go over the basics of a design sprint, tips and tricks for success, and get into specifics on how it can also be used in different settings. Participants will leave the workshop with the slide deck, a guide to conducting design sprints, and resources for further reading on the topic. Workshop Outline: Note: there will be a presentation both before and after each activity, and opportunity to ask questions throughout.

  1. Intro and overview of what a design sprint is + the case study we are using
  2. Activity 1 - conduct user interviews (1-on-1)
  3. Activity 2 - affinity map and analyze results (small groups)
  4. Activity 3 - sketch/design studio (solo)
  5. Activity 4 - paper prototype (small groups)
  6. Activity 5 - test (small groups)
  7. Activity 6 - synthesize and conclusions, practical takeaways (first in small groups, then together with entire workshop)

3.5 hours

Salon B

Jimmy Chandler

Jimmy Chandler has been collaborating with clients and colleagues to create user-friendly and effective websites and apps for more two decades. He has been teaching and developing design curriculum since 2015. Jimmy is currently a lead instructor at Flatiron School. Jimmy has been successful both conducting design sprints with clients and using it as part […]

Getting Started with Ethnography: UX Research in the Field

Traditional ethnographic research occurs where the participants live, work, etc. With shorter windows for research and limited access to participants, it is necessary to gather information about the people using products and services wherever and whenever possible. These observations and interviews can occur in some rather unlikely places such as at a technical tradeshow, over dinner, or, on an airplane. Some of these may be planned, but some may be spontaneous. The key is to learn to be flexible and to adapt to the situation. In this session the presenter will talk about personal experiences, both good and bad, in the field while observing people. She has learned the hard way from being inside moving vehicles; working in coal mines; watching physicians treating patients in hospitals; observing children in schools and being home schooled and professionals in offices. She will also share interesting anecdotes from colleagues and review both ethical and behavioral standards for researchers. This session will go into details about recommended gear to help the researcher to be successful. The presenter will also discuss how to best prepare oneself for the likely and unlikely surprises that come about with this type of work. The audience will be encouraged to ask questions and as time permits, to share their experiences. Activities will include planning for complex research scenarios, practice reacting to issues with regard to logistics, and analysis of the work. Participants will be asked to consider various gear setups and talk through the ethics surrounding difficult situations. After participating in this workshop you’ll be able to: Determine when a situation is appropriate for an ethnographic study. Select appropriate ethnographic studies for your work. Plan and conduct effective ethnographic studies. Analyze and synthesize your findings to make actionable recommendations. Help others to see the benefits of ethnographic methods.

8 hours

Salon A

Carol Smith

Carol Smith has an 18-year career in UX, collaborating on complex problems and working across industries and platforms. She is currently Sr. Research Scientist in HMI at Carnegie Mellon University’s SEI. She has led UX research for Uber’s self-driving cars and at IBM Watson among others. Carol has an M.S. in Human-Computer Interaction from DePaul […]

Good Show! Presentation and Facilitation for Creatives

Here’s the thing: The world is full of great ideas and important messages. But these often get lost amid noise, disorganization, disengaged audiences. We believe great ideas are worth exploring and we want to help build your world-changing stories. You don’t have to be a professional speaker to tell a good story. But you do need good stories to make an impact. This session will focus on helping participants present more confidently, create the right visuals, and practice verbal and nonverbal presentation skills to most effectively share their ideas. This session is for people who:

  • Have something to say and a venue to say it.
  • Want to learn to present with more impact.
  • Believe an engaged audience is the best audience.
  • Care about what they have to say.
  • Present or communicate to groups on a regular basis.
  This session will cover:
  • Audience: Learn how to analyze and understand your audience to ensure maximum impact.
  • Storytelling: Get that important message across by turning dry data and facts into an engaging and memorable narrative.
  • Presence: Step out from behind the podium with confidence and good energy while remaining true to who you are.
  • Visuals: Supplement your strong narrative and warm presence with relevant and meaningful visuals.Practice: Understand the importance of practice, practice, practice. Did we mention practice?

3.5 hours

Salon D

Natalie Levy-Costa

Natalie Levy-Costa is a Principal UX Designer & Strategist with Gannett and The USA TODAY Network. In that role, she pushes for more connection with end users, leads primary research efforts, is responsible for synthesizing and translating insights, and tells way too many stories about her dogs. The thing she loves most about her job […]

Designing Connected Content: A Workshop

Digital products are merely a vehicle through which to share content. Whether the content is products for sale, digital media, news, scientific invention, and more. But many teams struggle with how to move the user through this content because often the actual content is considered last in the design and development processes. This workshop isn't your usual content strategy workshop. You won't learn how to craft a story or how to make UX copy better. But you will learn how to use content as design material. "Design is the method of putting form and content together." -- Paul Rand When we start with context and give structure to the content, we create multiple windows into a world. We can create a platform that allows us to share content through multiple devices, regardless of screen size or non-screen experiences. By flipping the process to content first, the structure comes first so we can work in layers to make interface designs that help people make better sense of the content. In this workshop, we'll explore how to use a content model to design content and multiple interfaces. We'll work at the intersection of information architecture, content strategy, experience, and interface design to create an experience that meets customer needs and business goals.

3.5 hours

Salon C

Carrie Hane

Designing Connected Content: A Workshop Association Content Strategy Maturity Model Carrie Hane helps organizations create more effective content more consistently by coordinating the people, processes, and systems to build efficient content operations. For 20 years, she’s alternated between in-house web content lead and consulting, putting together cross-functional teams and creating processes that stick while untangling […]

Scalable Design Systems

The role of design with large organizations is expanding, spreading across product teams and influencing decision-making at higher and higher levels. This scale makes it increasingly challenging to align designers and product teams to deliver cohesive, consistent experiences across a customer journey. A design system is a framework of practices that bring designers, developers and products together. It is a platform to identify, decide on, and document what to share, from visual style and UI components to design patterns, accessibility, and content strategy. This workshop exposes you to the broad range of those considerations – the kinds of parts, products, people and practices involved—and equips you with tools and activities to start, spread, and sustain a system yourself. The role of design with large organizations is expanding, spreading across product teams and influencing decision-making at higher and higher levels. This scale makes it increasingly challenging to align designers and product teams to deliver cohesive, consistent experiences across a customer journey. This workshop exposes you to the core features of a design system – visual language and UI component design – to equip you with tools and activities to start, spread, and sustain a system yourself. WHY YOU SHOULD ATTEND Multiple design teams and development teams suffer from doing duplicative work, resulting in a customer journey that’s meant to be cohesive but ends up expensive or impossible to align and maintain together. Design systems save organization time and money, and foster positive energy among those who value efficiency and reuse. With the system as a backdrop, you will see designers, developers, and product managers aligning and motivated to bridge the gap between products. All of that leads to the ultimate goal: creating a cohesive journey that leads to a more valuable customer experience. WHO SHOULD ATTEND Designers, front end developers, product managers, content strategists, their leadership, and anyone interested in learning how to inject design systems into their broader organization. WHAT YOU’LL LEARN Over the course of a half-day, we’ll introduce design systems, layout a plan to get one started and dive deep into the design of visual language and UI components. We’ll learn about and practice how to: * Define your system’s scope, people who contribute, and products to which it applies * Plan an approach to start a system from scratch or reboot an existing effort * Deconstruct a design language into rigorous definitions of color, space and design tokens * Compose effective UI components, from atomic bits to sophisticated content

3.5 hours

Salon D

Nathan Curtis

Nathan co-founded EightShapes with Dan Brown in 2006. He’s passionate about information architecture, UX, front-end dev, and leads design systems consulting at EightShapes. He wrote Modular Web Design in 2009, blogs frequently on Medium.com today, and speaks regularly at events worldwide. Nathan has worked with design systems teams at Morningstar, Google, REI, Atlassian, Target, Fidelity, […]

Collaborative Improv: Building Better Products Through Improvisation

Flexibility within project dynamics is a key to success - be it adapting to project dynamics, client needs, or interpersonal relationships. Improvisational theater offers many constructs to “go with the flow” and build on our teammates ideas, successes, and even where we stumble. This workshop teaches the foundations of improv and provides direct correlations to UX research, design, and collaboration. Practitioners of all skill levels are welcome, and no previous performing experience is required. The goals are to use active listening and body language through improv as a way to improve our collaboration and product design. Product design does not happen in a silo with a single individual or skillset making all the decisions. Improvisational theater brings performers from all walks of life together in the creation of something unique, fun, and enjoyable. By adapting these lessons to product design, we can better collaborate across UX, design, content, development, our businesses, and users. Participants will gain an understanding for improvisation as a technique for presenting and collaborating in design studios. Notably, members will: - Gain immediate tools and techniques for fostering collaboration - Learn tactics for getting "unstuck" or working through technological or human hurdles - Be exposed to guidelines from theater than can foster a safe and supportive environment for product design.

3.5 hours

Salon C

David Farkas

David is a UX Designer living in Philadelphia, PA and has a passion for uncovering process and story through iterative client engagement. His experience includes work across a number of financial organizations, e-commerce platforms and a variety of business systems. As a co-author of UX Research, with O’Reilly, David explores research techniques and approaches to […]

Showcase Reception

Designing for Performance (How we built a better, faster USA TODAY)

by Marianne Epstein

Marianne Epstein is a Principal UX Designer at Gannett, focused on building flexible, scalable systems to meet the needs of the USA TODAY NETWORK’s many different kinds of users— including readers, journalists, advertisers, developers and designers. Outside of work (and screens) she designs books, sings in the City Choir of Washington, and is learning to sew.

 

Three Questions That Empower Designers to Do No Harm

by Lisa D. Dance

Lisa’s path to User Experience started when she was 9 years old and told her mother that she was not going to shop at a particular store anymore because of how they treated their customers. That experience began a lifelong interest in customer interactions and looking for ways to improve them. She founded ServiceEase, a consultancy to help businesses and nonprofits “be easy to do business with” both online and offline. In 2019, Lisa’s spearheaded the inaugural UX Census (RVA) Survey to help user experience professionals and companies better understand the landscape of user experience in the Richmond Virginia area (RVA). Lisa holds a Bachelor of Arts in Political Science, Post-Baccalaureate Certificate in Marketing, and a Specialization Certificate in Interaction Design.

 

Common Language: Writing for Your Users

by Kate Thacker

Kate Thacker is a UX designer focused on research and strategy at USA Today Network. She uses her background in journalism and communications to uncover user needs and behaviors and turn them into actionable insights. Kate believes in the power of qualitative user testing, open collaboration, and a well-written to-do list.

 

What's In Your Process?

by Jason Whishard, Daphne Bourne
 

From Bad Crops to Best Crop

by Patrick Slawinski

Patrick Slawinski has worked as a designer for over 13 years. He’s currently a Senior Designer for Gannett and he USA TODAY Network, where he’s led design for Gannett's custom content management system since 2014. He’s proud to empower journalists by identifying and solving complicated systemic problems in their daily workflows. Before starting at Gannett, Patrick designed rankings pages for U.S. News & World Report. Patrick has a bachelor’s degree from James Madison University’s School of Media Arts and Design and enjoys making music, playing tabletop RPGs, and watching professional wrestling.

 

Redesigning the Basics: Search Results

by Fletcher Maffett

Fletcher Maffett is a Senior Product Manager in charge of Search and Information Retrieval efforts at Gannett/USATODAY Network. Over the last 15 months, Fletcher has assisted Gannett with an overhaul of their search platform, and helped drive search-related product initiatives.

 

Making a Statement: IA/UX Values

by Jacqui Olkin

Jacqui Olkin is a UX consultant and has owned Olkin Communications Consulting for the past 15 years, specializing in assessments, user research, user-centered design, information architecture/taxonomy, and content strategy/governance. She is interested in codifying and promoting the professional values that guide responsible and ethical UX practice. Jacqui comes from the content side of the house, having worked in print and digital publishing prior to becoming a UX consultant. A runner, Washington Nationals baseball fan, and pond hobbyist, Jacqui makes her home outside of Washington, D.C., in Reston, Virginia.

 

Fight for UX Poster Series

by Sean Goodwin
 

American Sign Language Design

by Jibril Jaha

My name is Jibril Jaha. I was born deaf. I went to an oral deaf school. There, I’ve spent years doing speech therapy and hearing tests.Then, I went to college at RIT home of NTID where all Deaf and hard of hearing attended. I graduated with multidisciplinary study concentrating biotechnology, innovation management and minor deaf studies. In 2010, I started my journey in studying how Deaf technology makes an impact in our society since 2010. Accessibility was one of the pain points of my life as a deaf person. I was passionate about bridging accessibility for the Deaf with modern technology. Now I am a UX design student at an online immersive computer science program, lambda school. There I get the tools, resources and network to expand my potential as a User Experience Designer related to Deaf accessibility.

 

From User Focus to DCUX: A Historical Overview of UXPA DC Conferences (aka, Putting the You in UXPA DC)

by Jeffrey Ryan Pass, Jordan Higgins

Jeff Pass made his first website in 1997 and has been involved in digital communications, design, usability, and IA ever since. For the past 20+ years, Jeff has been a federal contractor and has worked as IA or UX lead on high-profile projects including HealthCare.gov, CFTC.gov, USPS.gov, and dozens of other government websites and apps. He helps lead the UX Community of Practice at Booz Allen Hamilton, has been a local organizer for World IA Day, IA Summit, IA Conference, User Focus, UXDC, and is the Programming Director for DCUX. Jeff has been attending and supporting UXPA DC programming for well over a decade and is excited to help tell the story of UXPA's conference history.

 

Fake It Till You Save It

by Sarah Dixon
Sarah Dixon is a psychology-major-turned-designer, passionate about producing usable and delightful designs that combine aesthetics and functionality. As a UX Designer for National Geographic, she helps create educational resources and online experiences to turbocharge the classroom. When she isn’t working, you’ll find Sarah laughing much too loudly and playing air drum.  

Icons vs. text: Do labels really matter?

by Janel Kiley
Janel is a Senior UX/UI designer at USA Today | Gannett and has almost 20 years of experience solving design problems for media orgs, non profits, and small businesses. Clients include National Geographic, UMass Boston, American University, and the American Association for the Advancement of Science. She earned a liberal arts degree from the University of Notre Dame and a master’s degree in design from the University of Baltimore. She also completed the UX course at General Assembly.   

Chatbots and the Rise of Conversational Design

by Tony Fugolo
   

Association Content Strategy Maturity Model

by Dina Lewis, Carrie Hane
Dina Lewis, CAE, is president of Distilled Logic and provides content strategy consulting for associations and nonprofit organizations. She serves on the ASAE Communication Professionals Advisory Council and is a former chairman of its Technology Section Council. She also hosts Content Forum, the community for association and nonprofit content strategy, and Review My Content to help organizations find content tools and services.  
Carrie Hane helps organizations create more effective content more consistently by coordinating the people, processes, and systems to build efficient content operations. For 20 years, she's alternated between in-house web content lead and consulting, putting together cross-functional teams and creating processes that stick while untangling information to make it usable for today and ready for tomorrow. She is the co-author of Designing Connected Content: Plan and Model Digital Products for Today and Tomorrow (New Riders, 2018). When not taming content, Carrie tries to tame her two boys. Content is easier.  

Cognitive Load: The Elephant in the Room

by Rajeev Subramanian
In his 15+ year career, Rajeev has worked in a variety of roles, spanning software engineering, sales and web design. Over the last 7 years, he has focused his efforts in the growing field of UX, helping organizations of all sizes creatively solve complex problems in the digital space. He currently works as an Experience Design Lead at AvalonBay Communities, a publicly traded real estate investment trust (REIT). In this role, he is helping define the future of all things digital and bringing UX to the forefront of a traditional industry ready for disruption. Rajeev received his B.S. in Computer Science from Georgetown University and his M.S. in Human Factors in Information Design from Bentley University.  

Connecting Users to their Products: An Investigation of Navigational Menu for The Motley Fool

by Illee Ipanag
 

Mobile survey UX design for older and younger adults

by Elizabeth Nichols
Elizabeth Nichols is a founding member of the Usability Lab at the U.S. Census Bureau.  The lab is located in the Center for Behavioral Science Methods. In that center, staff conduct usability studies, as well as cognitive testing, focus groups, and other experimental studies focusing on the measurement error associated with surveys and analyzing survey data.  She has a M.S. in Statistics from the George Washington University and over 20 years of hands-on experience with usability testing at the Census Bureau.  

Owning Your Design Mistakes

by Darsh Nand
Darsh Nand is a Senior UX Designer at GoCanvas, where he supports design and strategy of the GoCanvas native and web platforms. He started his career as a Financial Analyst after obtaining his Master's Degree in Information Technology and Bachelor of Arts in Economics. He quickly realized finance was not something he truly enjoyed and decided to switch careers into design, something he has always enjoyed. Over the last 6 years, he has worked as a UX Designer in adtech, Interaction/Service Designer in government contracting, and UX Designer in financial/banking. He is also passionate about paying it forward by mentoring junior designers and working on freelance projects with them through his own design firm, Dewey Design Labs.  

2.5 hours

Salon E

Registration

Keynote: Amy J. Ross, NASA

Amy J. Ross leads the Advanced Space Suit Pressure Garment development team at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center.  Every day is an adventure as technologies and concepts for spacesuits to take humans beyond Earth are realized. The scope of the work ranges from understanding human physiology to awareness of geologic exploration activities on planetary surfaces to knowledge of the fabrics that can keep humans safe and help them to be productive in hazardous environments.  Currently, her team is designing a suit of the future for demonstration on the International Space Station.

1 hour

Salon A-C

Amy J. Ross

Amy J. Ross leads the Advanced Space Suit Pressure Garment development team at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center. Every day is an adventure as technologies and concepts for space suits to take humans beyond Earth are realized.

Health-Thinking for Product Design

Today it’s easier than ever to design highly usable experiences that degrade the health of the people who use them. Whether we work on consumer apps or enterprise software, the choices we make as designers directly affect the physical, mental, social, and professional health of our users. So how do we design for values that promote a culture of health? Beyond “design thinking,” how do we embed health-thinking into our products and design decisions? This talk will look at the legacy of persuasive design philosophy that has led to our current, coercive technology present, and explore a vision for an alternate design future, including case studies, tools, and practical decision-making approaches for aligning design with values that promote long-term user and product health.

60m

Salon A

Jenka Gurfinkel

As a UX Lead at athenahealth Jenka designs products to empower patients, support providers, and improve population health outcomes. She has previously designed customer experience solutions for some of the world’s largest brands and organizations, including Toyota, AARP, and Live Nation. Her work and writing have been featured in Wired, TechCrunch, The LA Times, WBEZ, […]

Design the Warfighter

History is full of moments when design has played a part in the outcome of armed conflict. Not the design of weapons and inventions that take lives, but design that means to protect and save lives. Today we live in a world where designers are more thoughtful than ever of how their designs are meant to be used. However, designing for the military is not always black & white. How might we apply the lessons of history to make sure we are still able to design ethically for the military. After all; if all the ethical, human-centered designers leave, who's left making the design decisions?

60m

Salon B

Andrew Miller

Currently Design Lead for Amazon Internet of Things and Chief Design Officer of DC-based &Partners. Co-founding member of the Digital Services Coalition. Former Director of Product Design at USCIS, Digital Service Expert at DHS, Product Designer for Sandia National Labs, and ████ at the CIA.

Storytelling Research Results to Win Stakeholder Buy-In (Mini-Workshop)

Isn’t hard when you have finished conducting research, whether it is a usability test, interview series, or other qualitative research method, and present results to stakeholders only to get responses like: “well, you only tested with 5 people” or “I think this is just one person’s opinion”? This workshop is for you! Through her experience Stephanie Pratt will guide you through ways you can convert your results into a storytelling format that get responses like “oh, I would feel the same way!” from stakeholder who shrugged off your research results before and get action on your insights.

60m

Salon C

Stephanie M. Pratt

Stephanie M. Pratt is a User Experience Researcher at GoCanvas, building out their user experience research practice. She has her Master’s Degree in Human Factors Psychology and has worked in as a UX Designer / Researcher in government contracting, insurance, and tech startups over the last 8 years. Stephanie also co-chairs the UXPA DC mentorship […]

Inside the Hearts and Minds of Users: Foundational Qualitative Research and Beyond

"Qualitative research has been seen by some to be a less rigorous form of user experience testing to its “sister” Quantitative research. While Quantitative date can provide a gold mine of information on user behaviors (who can argue with click thru rate data?), Qualitative research provides equally important insights into how users feel about your products and why they make the choices they do. In this presentation we will share two case studies on qualitative research we completed in 2018. The goal of these studies was to better understand how users categorized our brands, what value it adds to their daily lives and why they subscribe to our products. This research resulted in valuable user insights and has led to the development of new products for our users in both the USA Today flagship brand and 109 local news sites. The first study (titled “Value Exchanges”) focused on gaining an understanding of participants digital habits, behaviors and motivations as it related to what we referred to as subscription, membership, and community. Our goal was to better understand how users defined these categories, what relationship exists between all three and where USA Today products fall within those categories. The second study (titled “Motivation to Subscribe”) quickly followed the first. It was conducted to better understand our subscribers’ motivations to subscribe to our local news products. We wanted to better understand what “pivot points” led to subscription and how to better capitalize on those “pivot points” to provide less friction and more of what our users love. Both studies were conducted using a qualitative research platform called dscout. This online journaling platform allowed us to interview and question “Scouts” in multiple local markets. Each Scout was able to record their answers on their phones and upload the video to the platform in real time. We were able to see Scouts answer questions in their homes, at their work, on a walk, etc. These situations provided learnings that we could not have anticipated, resulting in stronger findings. In the presentation, we will walk the audience through this process, so they better understand how dscout worked for us and how it might work for them."

60m

Salon D

Cathy Pages

Cathy Pages is the UX Director at The USA Today Network (Gannett). In that role she directs primary research efforts that directly improve the user experience of USA Today Network readers. Prior to working at USA Today, Cathy worked in industries such as global advertising, the tech industry and public relations to name a few. […]

Natalie Levy-Costa

Natalie Levy-Costa is a Principal UX Designer & Strategist with Gannett and The USA TODAY Network. In that role, she pushes for more connection with end users, leads primary research efforts, is responsible for synthesizing and translating insights, and tells way too many stories about her dogs. The thing she loves most about her job […]

Defense Against the Dark Patterns: How to Win the Fight Against Deceptive Design

From the simply annoying to the outright egregious, dark patterns—coined by Harry Brignull nearly a decade ago—intentionally trick people into doing things they don’t really want to do. What makes these pesky patterns so effective in the first place? And how can we as UXers wield our influence to try and rid the web of these manipulative designs?

60m

London I & II

Vidhika Bansal

Vidhika firmly believes that design is about people first, and technology second. She’s a tireless advocate for data-informed design (not to be confused with data-driven design), being content-first, and using behavioral science to fuel better product and service experiences. Over the last decade, she has helped shape brand, product, and design strategies for clients such […]

UX at the Crossroads: The Future is Human

As Tim Brown said years ago, "we need to return human beings to the center of the story. We need to learn to put people first." As customer and user experience practitioners, we face exciting new possibilities with artificial intelligence, VR, AR, chatbots, robots, and more. It's easy for us to be distracted by technology and lose track of the reason we exist: we are the voice for the very people who will use what we create. Our roots are in advocacy and empathy for, and understanding of, the people whose needs these technologies will meet. Using recent case studies, such as the Hen-na Hotel in Japan, which fired over half of its 243 robots after learning there are situations where they "truly aren't needed", we'll detail critical moments where we must be the voice of the people. During research phases, we have more unmoderated analytics and methods available than ever before, but we risk losing deep empathy for people. I'll share examples of how to balance these valuable methods with deep empathetic methods. During design, we may be pushed to jump to technologies that don't always align to what people need. I'll share sample use cases as well as how we can advocate for real human needs and devise strategies to align new, exciting technologies to where they will add real value (and save us all from where they won't). In summary, this talk will be a slightly heretical call to keep the future human while embracing the best of powerful new technology.

30m

Salon A

Ron Polka, Jr.

Over the last 14 years, I’ve immersed myself in a human-centered approach to delivering value for customers and the business across a wide variety of industries, including B2B (IT management, healthcare, agriculture) and B2C (hospitality, retail). I’ve worked on challenges for physical, service, and digital experiences. I spent a lot of time learning about customer […]

Smart Speakers In Assisted Living Homes: A Field Study

Smart Speakers like the Amazon Echo and Google Home are enjoying an adoption rate at this stage of the technology that is higher than that of smartphones such as the the iPhone enjoyed at the same stage when they were first brought to market back in 2007. One of the demographics that potentially could benefit meaningfully from this emerging technology are seniors. In this talk, I will provide a summary of findings from 10 face-to-face interviews that I will be conducting over the summer with seniors who use smart speakers. I will ask two types of questions: ones that pertain to context of use, such as: Who they are the users, What is their life situation, When do they use their smart speakers and for what; and ones that pertain to usability, such as: How more easily (or less easily) are users able to accomplish tasks with smart speakers compared to other technology (or no technology). During the interviews, in addition to asking the participants contextual questions, I will also ask them to use their smart speaker for some specific tasks and I will report on my observations. My goal is to provide meaningful information that will enable Product managers UX designers of voice first interfaces to design highly usable experiences for seniors.

30m

Salon B

Faris Bouzid

I am a rising senior at McLean High school, in McLean, Virginia, where I am Head of the Voice Engineering club.  I am interested in exploring UX field and usability research and potentially become a  professional UX practitioner.  In college, I plan to pursue a dual degree in Anthropology and Business.I am a rising senior […]

Breaking Down Silos in the Healthcare Industry Using Design Thinking

"Our clients in the healthcare industry want to build lifelong relationships with patients, empower them to live healthy lives, and improve the quality of care; however, the various departments and offices within their organizations are siloed, making it difficult to innovate. A design thinking approach has helped break down organizational walls through empathetic, cross-functional collaboration. Throughout our session, we will: • Tell personal stories about challenges we’ve faced when working with clients in the healthcare industry • Talk about what we’ve discovered during user research and stakeholder sessions • Explain how we empathize with users and use storytelling to communicate our ideas • Describe how we use testing to continually improve online experiences We will describe how we help our healthcare clients focus on the entire ecosystem, rather than just the areas in which they work. Our design thinking process fosters collaborative, innovative environments and considers impacts on communities. To do this, we involve various departments and people of different demographics in the redesign process. When experiences are designed in silos, through the lens of a single group within the organization, usability issues and barriers are only moved to different locations in the experience. By removing silos, we can think about the healthcare ecosystem and experience holistically across the enterprise to create better wellness outcomes. We will provide actionable takeaways for how to think about problems holistically across the value chain to create services and experiences that are truly transformative."

30m

Salon C

Lashanda Hodge

Lashanda is a passionate experience design leader and strategist with over 12 years of experience. Lashanda has guided clients and project teams across a variety of business sectors using a holistic and human-centered approach, infusing user insights and creativity.

Jayne Thomas

Jayne is a creative experience lead who is passionate about using technology to solve business challenges and improve people’s lives. She believes that the best solutions are designed when the experience team collaborates effectively with the client. Jayne frequently involves clients in the design process to ensure the best solutions are identified and championed.

Translating Physical Experiences to Digital Spaces

"Physical spaces have concepts behind them that can be in opposition or conflict to the digital experience. People often interact and spend time in a physical space in a way they would not in a digital space. Different constraints of the space and the concept can lead to decisions that are difficult to translate to a digital experience. How do we create a unified but distinct experience across platforms? What tools are at our disposal and how do we ensure the digital space is a complimentary experience and not an attempt at recreating the physical space online akin to what Google Street View is to actual streets? The default mode of thinking when designing a digital space for a physical one is to create an experience appropriate to the platform and then apply the correct colors, fonts, and logos. This will create an experience that looks the same on the surface because the same visual language is present but that might feel entirely foreign when it comes to the digital experience. If we can take more than that surface level design and dive deeper in the the how and why a physical space is designed, we can design more meaningful, cohesive experiences for the digital space. Snøhetta describes itself as an “integrated design practice of architecture, landscape, interiors, furniture, graphic and brand design.” They recently completed a project for Holzweiler, a fashion brand in Norway, that spanned their showroom, flagship store, and their main website. The physical spaces are light, spacious, and warm with elements designed specifically to help change and elevate typical retail experiences and interactions. The website is designed from the same place. The goal was to create a “seamless retail experience for Holzweiler’s global customers in both the digital and the analogue sphere.” But where the physical space stands out in its design and conceptual thinking, the digital experience falls short and feels similar to the many other online retail experiences. If we look beyond retail experiences we can examine traditional print based mediums that now have to exist across multiple spaces. Magazines, newspapers, and libraries have associated apps, websites, and e-reader platforms that run into these problems. Is it possible to take the inverse of this idea and translate a digital experience into a physical one? When new apartments are built, many people’s first experience with their potential future residence is the website. How can that experience get translated back to the physical space so those two interactions feel connected? This session will explore our universal goal: How design can make various access points for our digital and physical experience feel seamless and unified. Without this, our digital access points feel like all others and disappear in the crowd."

30m

Salon D

Michael McDermott

I am an educator and designer currently teaching in the School of Art at George Mason University. Before switching to academia full-time, I worked at the General Design Co. in Washington DC on branding and identity projects for a wide variety of clients creating both print and digital pieces. As an Assistant Professor at Mason […]

Vulnerability in UX: Embracing Potential Failure on Your Way to Success

"You measure [vulnerability] by the amount of courage to show up and be seen when you can't control the outcome." - Brené Brown Over the course of my career as a User Experience professional, nothing has disappointed me more than the aversion to test a defined hypothesis. The field’s grounding in the scientific method is what drew me to this work when I was looking to transition from a biopharma scientist who freelanced as a web designer to a full time web designer. This talk will surface critical observations and underpinnings that inform our practice and move “failure” and vulnerability out of the shadows while strategically replacing the scientific method to the forefront of UX best practices. *Testing is the opportunity to make controlled mistakes. Solid research is based on a well-formed hypothesis, meaningful experiments, quality data, and honest analysis. Avoiding research is fundamentally about limiting vulnerability and its connection to fallibility. However, sacrificing experimentation will eventually catch up with any project. Instead, design experiments that test a specific hypothesis: • Constrain the scope of your study • Agree on your metrics and definition of success before you test • Make sure your team and stakeholders are clear about what you are testing *Are you afraid of being wrong or not being right? Everyone wants to be a Subject Matter Expert (SME). It distinguishes us as an authority in our field and creates a sense of superiority vis-a-vis colleagues and clients. We start to become obsessed with being the one to come up with ""next big thing"" and are constantly competing for opportunities to implement our ideas. However, we are conditioned to believe that our expertise is built on fleeting capitol and limited opportunities. Ultimately, production decisions are made out of desperation and testing of ideas is sacrificed to protect egos. Ethical UX designers embrace Outcomes over Outputs as their North Star. They make a conscious decision to ensure that their design outputs: • Clearly define and communicate the outcomes that are valued and important to their team, users, and customers • Reflect on the impact of their decisions-how long will it take to implement vs. how long it will take to measure success • Reflect their commitment to implementing the idea/concept, not the design *Empathize with your users and your team. Great UX requires the designer’s collaboration with Product and Development as well as Marketing and Sales. A successful designer will not only employ empathy with the end user or customer, but will also empathize with their colleagues and clients. Take the time to understand their perspectives and motivations. Encourage them to be open and honest about both. Respect people’s opinions and ideas by emphasizing continuous learning and experimentation. But most importantly, be vulnerable: • Be honest with your team when your hypotheses are proven wrong • Admit when someone else’s idea works • Facilitate open dialogue about pivoting and/or tweaking roadmaps, goals, or metrics"

30m

London I & II

Joi Coleman

Joi Coleman is a lead user experience designer with Booz Allen Hamilton’s USPS.com Delivery Team where she brings her expertise to the United States Postal Service’s suite of consumer web applications. After graduating from Howard University in 2005 with a Bachelors in Biology, she spent 5 years in molecular technology research with GlaxoSmithKline in the […]

Lunch

60m

The Geopolitics of UX: A Simulation-Based Approach to Design

Tech and UX exist within a global operating environment increasingly characterized by a state of near constant geopolitical flux- dynamic changes within the geopolitical realities of our world. The link between geopolitics and tech has never been stronger, yet mindful collaboration between the two sectors is still minimal. Tech and design are best understood within the (geo)political flux umbrella —  they are needed to safeguard digital assets and freedoms from negative changes that can affect operations, and offers the chance to more effectively deploy digital assets better when opportunities open up. To be successful, designers need to understand the geopolitical environment in which they're designing, how to evaluate the information (including Big Data) that they get about it, and how to effectively incorporate those elements into the way they design. To achieve this, a simulation-based approach is critical, allowing designers to experience the effects of geopolitical changes, better understand geopolitical realities for which they are designing, and give them an opportunity to be exposed to a wider spectrum of idea, cultures, ethics, and values. Through simulation modeling, designers can take a more mindful approach to design for greater inclusivity, not just paying lip service, but effectively integrating more diverse ideas that they've come to understand better through experience.

60m

Salon A

Milena Rodban

Born in Baku, Azerbaijan, Milena Rodban was raised with a keen appreciation for the political, economic, social, and cultural forces that shape the world around us. She has nearly a decade of experience in advising companies on how to understand the geopolitical forces that shape their operating environments, and creating ways to integrate actionable insight […]

It’s “Disabled” not “Differently-Abled”: Researching Beyond Abled People

"Approximately 20% of Americans are disabled, and many more benefit from good accessibility, but despite this disabled people can be overlooked when it comes to research and design. When disabled people are included in the research, it is sometimes clear that the researcher hasn’t fully thought through their inclusion. It may be difficult for them to take surveys or sort cards, the wording of questions might be unintentionally offensive, or the machines being used for usability testing might not be setup properly. In this session, we’ll go over some common pitfalls that researchers can face and ways to avoid them based on disabled users’ own experiences. We’ll talk about ways to make common research techniques more accessible, how to approach disabled participants about their needs, and how to create inclusive personas. We’ll also look into unique usability issues that can arise for different people with disabilities and how those can affect the research you do. The audience members will leave this session with a greater appreciation of the scope of disabilities, the issues faced by disabled participants, and solid ways to improve the inclusivity and accessibility of their research techniques for disabled people."

60m

Salon B

Lindsey Dragun

Lindsey Dragun (drag-uh n) is a former full-stack developer, who transitioned into tech after earning an MA in International Peace & Conflict Resolution. They have a passion for accessibility across tech and teaching others how to better improve the usability of their applications. In their spare time, Lindsey plays video games, volunteers with local tech […]

The Ethical Researcher’s Checklist

"As the tech industry matures, organizations incorporate more user research into their development cycles. Doing research with people presents us, as UX professionals, a major ethical challenge, however: how do we balance collecting data to make smart design decisions with protecting users’ safety, autonomy, and privacy? Today, product teams have numerous ways of collecting data and researching users. But some of these methods can be incredibly invasive as well as dangerous. For example, in 2017, Steven Englehardt, Gunes Acar, and Arvind Narayanan at Princeton University’s Center for Information Technology Policy (CITP) released a report investigating session replay scripts like FullStory and SessionCam. Unlike traditional analytic services that aggregate user behavior, session replay scripts record and playback individual browsing sessions. This means that design teams can observe a user’s scrolling behavior, keystrokes, and even an entire page's content as if they were in the same room as that user. The purpose of this data collection is for designers to observe how users interact with websites so they can identify usability issues. What the CITP team found, however, is that while these tools provide designers valuable insights into user behavior, they also collect or only partially redact sensitive form text (e.g., passwords) and are vulnerable to network surveillance. A common user research tool, if not implemented with care, can create serious privacy and security risk to users. So, how can product teams avoid exposing users to such risk? The answer is ethical research practices. Simply put, ethics are principles that describe right and wrong or more correct and less correct behavior. I argue that there are six major ethical research principles that should guide product teams during user research: 1) Validity: Researchers produce findings that accurately represent users and the phenomena of interest 2) Wellbeing: Researchers minimize the risks and maximize the benefits research participants experience 3) Autonomy: Researchers disclose enough information to research participants so they can make an informed decision to take part in the study. Researchers also avoid manipulating or coercing participants to remain in a study 4) Privacy and Security: Researchers keep research participants’ personal data private and safe 5) Honesty: Researchers report findings to stakeholders accurately 6) Value: Researchers conduct research that tests important organizational assumptions and influences strategy Designing user research projects around these principles protects the wellbeing and dignity of research participants. But these principles also protect organizations. As users become savvier about how organizations collect and use their data, product teams that violate these principles can become embroiled in controversy and seriously violate consumer trust. In this talk, I will guide audience members through a checklist of steps they can use to a) recognize potential ethical violations in their user research plans; b) minimize the impact of unethical decisions in the field; and c) promote ethical practices across stakeholders. I will frame each principle around real-life case studies of ethical challenges I have faced while working as UX researcher with early-stage startups and community organizations in industries like healthcare and education."

60m

Salon C

Alba Villamil

Alba N. Villamil is an independent User Experience Researcher who specializes in designing for the social sector. Her projects focus on underserved populations such as refugees, low-income parents, and domestic violence survivors. In addition to working with community organizations, she has also worked on projects with the Harvard Kennedy School and Rochester City School District.

Single-Subject Research Design: A Viable Alternative to Large-scale AB Testing

"Single-subject research design is a way to effectively AB test UX questions with a manageable sample size of participants, a small budget, and in any phase of a project. While traditional AB testing is a very valuable way to answer UX questions, it can be a challenge for smaller organizations or organizations where technical limitations create barriers to modifying and delivering different layouts to different users. However, single-subject research design allows you to collect similar quantitative data in a simpler way. Single-subject research design, also called ABAB testing, measures a single individual’s behavior multiple times in the same session: at baseline (A), with an intervention (B), back at baseline (A), and then with the intervention again (B). In doing so, we are able to collect four data points per variable measured for each user. For user research purposes, the baseline state can be your primary layout or an existing state of the page. The intervention state can be your secondary layout or modifications to the existing page. In each of the four states, the user will be asked to complete the same task, and variables such as time to complete or subjective feelings about the process can be measured. The test is repeated with multiple users, but because each user provides four data points for each variable that we are measuring, even a small test of six users will provide at least 24 data points to analyze. If the intervention (B), out-performs the baseline (A), the data will reveal a classic graphical pattern that zig-zags up and down as the differences between the A and B state are repeated for each task, independent of how late in the study the task was completed. At the American-Speech Language-Hearing Association, we used this methodology to determine which layout in our Online Store would be most effective for promoting sales. The team was divided on the value of the existing Store layout or a newly-designed one. Only a small user research budget was available and there was a tight timeframe in which to determine which layout to use. Single-subject research design was employed with six participants to measure how quickly they found a product they were interested in buying and how satisfied they were with the process. It became clear that the new layout was more effective than the existing layout, and we are in the process of making that change now. This methodology is incredibly flexible; it can be used in wireframe usability testing, information architecture studies, or in usability studies on your existing website’s layout. Its scope and manageable sample size make it a valuable option for data-driven decision making at any step in a project’s life cycle. It’s possible to see real trends with very few participants and feel comfortable with the results because of the tried and true ABAB framework."

60m

Salon D

Rhoni Rakos

Rhoni has recently taken a new position as the Director of User Experience at Pantheon, a technology consulting firm based in Arlington, VA. She has been a UX professional for 10 years and has worked in startups, consulting firms, non-profits, and has freelanced. Rhoni leads the UX/CX efforts at Pantheon, focused both on providing data […]

Not a Guinea Pig: Building Trust Through Research Ethics During User Interviews

Idea: In a cultural moment when the public is newly aware of both the power and risk of the digital tools we let into our intimate lives, how can we as design researchers continue to harness the power of delving deep into people’s thoughts to create personalized and delightful experiences, while respecting people’s need for trustworthiness? Problem: Human-centered design research relies upon the skill of a facilitator to convince a total stranger in 60 minutes or less to share their thoughts honestly. This is a difficult ask even within a close relationship, so how can you build the foundation of trust needed to encourage your study participants to be vulnerable? Action: This presentation will illustrate practical strategies to wield the tools of research ethics in order to set interview participants at ease, allow you to gather more valuable information, and create an environment for healthy repeat engagements. Key Concepts: The keys to building trust are to: • Set the right foundation • Rid yourself of your own assumptions • Speak their language"

60m

London I & II

Kelly Tsao

Kelly Tsao is a UX/UI designer with a passion for user research. She studied marketing and interaction design at Washington University in St. Louis, where she combined the consumer behavior and market research elements of the business degree with human-centered design principles. Kelly has a cumulative 5.5 years of prior experience working in startups, media […]

The One-Off Comment

"As User Experience professionals we are trained advocates for our end-users. We are programmed to put them first. Our research focuses on understanding their behaviors, motivations, and needs. So we listen when they say things. But we shouldn’t act on everything we hear - especially those pesky one-off comments. One-off comments are trickier than you might think. They can skew your perception of an issue and derail you from providing a quality user experience to your true audience. You’d be surprised how much damage a one-off comment can do even if it’s a positive comment. Oh, and these comments don’t always present themselves as obvious one-offs. Even if they do to some they don’t to all. Learn how to spot the one-off when it inevitably pops up and how to stop it from derailing your work in this 20-minute talk with Senior User Experience Architect and Researcher, Rachael Pollack."

30m

Salon A

Rachael Pollack

Rachael Pollack is a Senior User Experience Architect and Researcher at LookThink. She specializes in translating complex user behaviors, needs, and motivations into simplified and intuitive interfaces. She has worked across a variety of industries including technology start-ups, pharma, education, government, and consumer-facing products but specializes in association and non-profit work.

Hack empathy to create more inclusive design decisions

"Inclusive UX decisions start with empathy. However, what often makes true empathy more difficult is our own worldview, values, and morals. To escape those restraints and capture an accurate picture of who we are designing for, we need to understand the moral foundations of people other than ourselves. That way we can easily determine if a certain label feels too authoritarian or if a UX strategy to reward only certain users triggers feelings of unfairness. Using Moral Foundations Theory as a guide and pulling from more than a decade of design experience in the social impact sector, Chris Montwill will walk through six moral foundations (Care/Harm, Fairness/Cheating, Loyalty/Betrayal, Authority/Subversion, Liberty/Oppression, and Sanctity/Degradation), apply it to real life UX decisions, and explain how it can help us make more inclusive design decisions. We will also walk through how this theory can help our users understand other people's perspectives and values. You'll leave this talk with a new way to understand your audiences and, hopefully, a touch more empathy."

30m

Salon B

Christopher Montwill

Chris is a multidisciplinary, award-winning creative director that believes a good story, questioning the status quo, and a driven organization can change the world. He has worked with clients such as the USO, The ALS Association, Natural Resources Defense Council, and the PAN Foundation to uncover unique insights that create smart, impactful strategies, brands, campaigns, […]

Governing Conflict in Your Design System. Build it Faster without Wanting to Kill Each Other.

"There’s no way around it — any design system project comes with disagreement and spirited debate. Because a design system serves not just many products, but also many stakeholders, from designers and engineers, to marketers and content strategists. Each product team and each discipline brings a unique set of goals and perspectives, and often they’re at odds. These disagreements, if left unresolved, can K.O. your design system before it even gets started. I know, because it’s happened to me. The good news is — it doesn’t need to be this hard. Through my successes and failures building design systems, I’ve uncovered some strategies you can use to keep your team moving forward in harmony. You’ll leave this talk with an understanding of the following: - How to document governance processes to help your team answer the most polarizing questions surrounding design systems, such as when to use an existing component vs create a new component. - How to involve stakeholders across your organization, without stalling your design system or falling victim to design by committee. - How to define your design system team’s roles and responsibilities, as well as how others can contribute to the system."

30m

Salon C

JD Jones

JD Jones is a Senior User Experience Designer at Modus. He is an avid believer in user-centered design, cross functional teams, and designing to deliver business outcomes, not outputs. JD works with the Modus Create UX team to create awesome experiences for products that matter. He graduated with a masters degree in human-computer interaction from […]

Persuasion or coercion? The promise and peril of psychology in UX design

"As UX designers, we rely on psychology to build intuitive, human-centered products and experiences. We all understand how abiding by Hick’s law and minimizing cognitive load, can improve usability. In recent years, a surge of clickbait articles has bombarded our industry touting even greater use of psychological principles on projects. Headlines like “Why UX Designers Need to Understand the Psychology of Users,” “The Neuroscience of Awesome UX,” and “How to Build Habit-Forming Products” make claims that we can have an even greater influence on users. Unfortunately, much of this content is produced by the latest UX design tools or by digital marketers pushing their platforms and services. Psychological principles are powerful, and it’s crucial that we use them responsibly. How can we draw clear ethical lines to ensure that our work doesn’t cross from influence to coercion or from engagement to addiction? In this talk, we’ll take a step back and look at immediacy bias, Baader-Meinhof phenomenon, loss aversion, halo effect, and other psychological principles. I will outline the benefits and potential consequences of these techniques. We’ll look at the devastating impact that some of today’s web and social media platforms have on the well being of users and wrestle with questions of whether their negative impact was caused by unintended consequences or if they deliberately used of psychological techniques to achieve their desired goals. You should leave with a greater understanding to avoid misusing cognitive biases even if they are for good intentions. Our industry can be more conscientious and judicious in how we use psychology and neuroscience in the products and services we create. To achieve this goal, we should have more meaningful discussions to ensure that we aren’t engineering experiences that foster addictive behavior and take away a person’s ability to make their own choices."

30m

Salon D

Sid Barcelona

I am a creative director with over 25 years of experience in design, branding, strategy, and UX. I’m currently at Threespot, a digital agency in DC that works exclusively with foundations, nonprofits, and government agencies on progressive causes for social good. I collaborate with UX designers and technologists to create engaging, audience-centered, digital experiences that […]

Conducting Usability Testing with Highly Trained Users and Complex Systems

"User Experience professionals apply our methods to a wide range of domains. We always try to learn as much as we can about the users and their tasks. However, as technology progresses, UX practitioners are working with systems that are more and more advanced, and users who are highly trained and experienced. In these situations, it may be impossible to fully understand the users’ goals, tasks, and strategies, even with time available for user and task analyses. It is still important to incorporate good user experience design and evaluation methods into the development process, but we may need to adapt our approach to accommodate these conditions. We recently conducted several usability tests of complex systems used by highly educated and highly skilled professionals. Although we were already experienced in conducting usability tests, we found that without a thorough understanding of the users and their tasks, some of the traditional strategies didn’t work. For example, the moderator was often unable to determine when to assist the participant or how much assistance to provide. We tried different approaches to these challenges, some of which worked better than others. In this presentation, we will share our experiences and lessons learned with these tests. We will address a number of topics, including: • Learning the system - How much do UX professionals really need to know? • Picking tasks - What should you consider as you select tasks for the test? • Training participants – Training for brand new complex systems is usually long and thorough, but this isn’t possible for usability tests lasting just one or two hours. How much training do you need to provide to the participants? What are good approaches to providing the training? • Staffing the tests – Who should observe the tests (such as developers and domain experts, who know how to use and fix the system)? How should they be involved in assisting the participants when needed? • Moderating –How do you interact with participants when you can’t always follow what they’re doing? How do you determine when to intervene? • Logistics - Since these systems often depend on a complex database, what should you consider regarding the setup and management of data for each participant? • Recording results – How do you know when the participants are experiencing problems? How can you identify solutions to these problems? How do you know if the participants complete the task successfully? • Working with the team – How do you determine how the team members can contribute to the process of usability testing and redesign?"

30m

London I & II

Robin Kaplan

Robin Kaplan is a Research Statistician at the Office of Survey Methods Research at the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), where she has worked the past six years. She does research on questionnaire design, respondent burden, sensitive questions,  usability testing, and design. She has worked on a number of projects to help improve the usability […]

Jean E. Fox

Jean Fox has been a User Experience Specialist at the Bureau of Labor Statistics for more than 20 years.  She works on both the design and the evaluation of BLS systems for data collection, analysis, and dissemination.  Recently, she conducted usability tests on a number of advanced systems used by highly educated statisticians, mathematicians, and economists to […]

Quick Wins: Making an Impression with your UX Strategy

"As both User Experience, and the positive impact it can have on both a product and it’s companies bottom line has become more widely recognized, it has become more and more common for UX personnel to be brought on with unrealistic expectations and little organizational support or structure that would allow for UX to have any sort of meaningful impact on their organization. On top of that, many UX professionals are forced to “evangelize” their craft in an uphill battle to gain support from other departments or coworkers. Situations like these can be extremely taxing to work in and make it difficult to have any designated plan of action. Solving this type of problem is exactly what Rolf Molich and UXPA Boston challenged us to think about in April. This UX Strategy challenge tasked us with answering questions such as what is a UX Strategy and how is it influential in bringing about a change to your organization, what to include in a strategy, such as short term goals, long term goals, and methodologies to use. This challenge also helped us identify techniques to use to garner quick and reliable support from coworkers and management. Our submission on these topics was judged by a panel of 6 UX experts, and of 13 submissions was one of the few to receive a cash prize. This 20-minute presentation will act both as an exploration of UX Strategies in general and also as a case study on our attempt to create one. Attendees will hear us talk not just about our learnings from the challenge, but also the mistakes we made, and some practical buy-in methodologies to be applied at your own organizations. During this talk, we would love to help answer questions related to UX Strategy and think that this talk would be beneficial for all levels of UX practitioners but we believe that in-house UX personnel and novice UX designers would find this very interesting."

30m

Salon A

Nick Weinel

Nick’s work includes conducting user experience evaluations, usability testing, participant recruitment, and marketing outreach. A University of Maryland Alum, Nick is active in the DC design community and strives to expand his capabilities in all disciplines of UX design.

Mark Becker

Mark leads projects involving usability evaluations, task analyses, and other user research. He has also played a support role on a wide variety of projects, including accessibility reviews, ergonomic evaluations, mental modeling, and interface design and redesign efforts.

Neha Kale

Neha has a strong background in human-computer interaction, user experience, quality assurance, and accessibility. Prior to joining UserWorks, she interned at Munich Reinsurance America, Inc. where she was responsible for evaluating and improving the user experience of the insurance buying process. Neha also has 4 years of experience as a Software Quality Analyst in India. […]

Designing for Diversity: Three Takeaways for Teams

"As UX designers, we spend a lot of our time imagining and building experiences for others… medical forms, social interactions, learning platforms–the list goes on. Over time, these experiences take up a large part of people’s lives, affecting how they interact with the world and the people around them. Shouldn’t we be ensuring that these experiences are inclusive and diverse? In this talk, I propose that we use team diversity to generate design diversity. I’ll discuss three insights based on my experience leading a pilot of 16 teams testing various diversity & inclusion (D&I) techniques. What can you, as an individual, do today to progress? 1) Welcome ideas different than your own. Do your meetings ever feel uncomfortable? No? Something is wrong. Discussions with conflicting thoughts require more effort from all team members, which leads to an increase in performance and quality of work. Part of this means learning to get comfortable with the uncomfortable. 2) Don’t pull in people from your circle. When you refer a friend to a position – someone you studied with or from the same circle as you – you are contributing to the lack of diversity. Expand your thinking. Don’t always require degreed professionals. Post on niche job boards. When asking for feedback on an idea or project, go beyond your inner circle. 3) Use inclusion surveys to quantify and benchmark progress. You can’t change what you don’t measure. Many D&I surveys exist to prompt a conversation about what you and your team need to grow, and these will help you move beyond measurement towards action for more inclusive workplaces. How might you make your team, and the industry, better? These are important questions to consider. The power of diversity ensures that what we build is appealing and usable by a much wider audience."

30m

Salon B

Michaela Kerem

Michaela Kerem is a User Experience Service Manager at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (JHU/APL) in Laurel, MD. By leading the research and testing of internal and external applications, she guides clients to develop a deeper understanding of the needs and behaviors of their users. She is also a project manager on the […]

7 colors of the Accessibility rainbow (for beginners)

My talk will cover the following 3 points: 1. Why Accessibility is important, 2. 7 colors of the Accessibility rainbow 3. Sharing some useful resources that will help you learn about accessibility

15m

Salon C

Sruti Vijaykumar

Sruti is working at UserWorks as a User Experience Specialist while completing a Master of Science degree in Human-Centered Computing at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County. She has a special interest in designing for accessibility and has hands-on experience in conducting usability tests with participants who have blindness, low-vision, motor impairments, and cerebral palsy. […]

Storyboarding in Product Design

Storyboarding in today's product design cycle is implemented very loosely if at all included. This talk would be about its importance, the points to keep in mind while storyboarding and all the elements that communicate a wholesome product cycle story.

15m

Salon D

Swetha Suresh

As an Architect turned UX & Product Designer, Swetha’s love for user centric design and aesthetics of the physical and digital world has guided her every decision. She collaborates with teams to develop design systems, strategies, and processes to improve user’s experience. Swetha now works as a Product Designer at NGP VAN providing tech support […]

Designing For Things You Don’t Understand And People Who Are Smarter Than You

"Building a quantum computer requires a team with deep expertise in about a dozen fields: quantum physics, lasers, optics, electrical engineering, mechanical engineering, embedded computing , high performance computing, you name it. And at least for now, using a quantum computer to do anything productive also requires deep expertise in fields like in discrete mathematics, theoretical physics, and quantum information science. It’s not all hardware though—in fact, a great deal of the important work to make quantum computing available to everyone is in software: software to coordinate and control complex embedded systems, to schedule and perform calibration, to schedule and run algorithms, to encode and decode the information the quantum processor actually uses. Of course, all of these interaction patterns, behaviors, and interfaces need to be designed. As I’m aware, there are no product designers in the world that are also PhD-level experts in quantum physics. Which means the job falls to people like me, who like science but have’t formally studied physics or math in over a decade. All that said, this isn’t a talk about quantum computing (at least not directly). It’s a talk that uses my experience at a quantum hardware and software company (and before, at a large consultancy) to answer a bigger question: how do you design for things you don’t understand and for people that are smarter than you? And what can that teach us about being better designers overall? It turns out, you design for quantum physicists much like you design anything for anyone, just …moreso. As opposed to a consumer product, where you can fool yourself into believing that your prior experience is enough to inform your choices, being out of your depth in this way can actually be a boon, forcing you into a more inquisitive, facilitative, and research-driven mode; one that we all should spend more time in anyway. We'll cover: * How to identify the things you have to learn, and the things you can leave to the experts * The transformative power of shared vocabulary * How to get over your impostor syndrome, and embrace being the resident dumbass. * Extracting useful information from people who know too much. * Why it’s okay to let UIs get busy, ugly and weird. * The challenges (and benefits!) of designing for exclusively expert power-users. * And we’ll close with some practical, useful tips and methods for having productive working relationships with your stereotypical highly-technical user or SME. We won't be covering: Much about quantum computing itself—I’ll give a basic overview and some details about the engineering of our systems, but more than that isn’t relevant or necessary for this session."

60m

London I & II

Coleman Collins

Coleman runs the design function at IonQ, a College Park-based company who have (at the time of this submission, and depending on how you measure these things) built the world’s most powerful quantum computer. Of the many things a designer might do, he mostly operates as a generalist, with a bent towards the prototyping/building side […]

Designing digital access to government programs for non-digital native populations

"For the past 2.5 years, we have been researching and developing online tools to help AARP reach their goal of 10 million low-income seniors who are eligible for tax credits and Snap (food stamps) benefits. This talk will go into the challenges we had designing for seniors, how to overcome someone who never used a mouse before, language barriers and trends in how seniors use the internet. I will cover what tools we used such as invision to create mock chat bots, web pages and different formats to do user acceptance testing and find an interface that worked for most test users. I will cover some insights we gained from testing and revealing how wrong we were with our assumptions, showing the attendees that testing your user is so important and how assumptions are a great starting point, but that is all they are. I will show our final tools and how we continue to evolve and are now using multiple formats, text, web, and we are doing testing for Voice (Alexa) and hope to have that launched by September/October ready for the conference."

15m

Salon C

Adam Motiwala

Adam Motiwala serves as Product Owner at Fifth Tribe. He sits in the middle of creative storytelling, innovating new products and services, and leading marketing campaigns. He has worked with leaders from the United Nations World Food Programme, International Federation of the Red Cross Red Crescent, Peace Corps, Oxfam, Department of Defense, Department of Homeland […]

Don’t Document It, Prototype It!

"Is your documentation too long? Is your documentation too short? Yes. The answer is always yes to both of these questions. Master the skill of communicating UX requirements to your development team with annotated prototypes. This lightening talk with guide you through the basics of building a highly useful prototype that serves as living documentation for your project while creating a visual pathway into the brain of your developers. Topics include: • Discussion of the value of prototyping and the advantages of visual communication. • Real world examples of successful and less-than-successful documentation styles. • Three specific styles of annotated prototypes. • How to keep your prototype accessible and up to date."

15m

Salon D

Michael Owens

Michael Owens is a user experience professional with Design for Context, a UX design consultancy in the Washington, DC area. She has over 20 years of experience in end-to-end design, development, and management of user-centered design projects. Michael’s work on projects includes user research, UX design and prototyping, usability testing, UI development, and project management. […]

7 Reasons Why We Need More Designers in Crypto

More designers needed! Learn how UX will shape the future of new use cases for the blockchain and cryptocurrency space.

15m

Salon C

Kasey Jean

Kasey holds a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree from Tufts University and SMFA, as well as a certificate from Designlab’s UX Academy. She worked 5 years as a designer across both startups and large companies in the Bay Area, California. Then she moved back to the East Coast and began teaching at Designlab remotely to […]

Fly On The Wall: How to gain actionable user insights through simple observation

Have you ever wondered why the website you spent so much effort designing wasn't living up to user's expectations? Have you ever received complaints such as 'I just couldn't find what I was looking for' but when you asked the user to give you more detail, they simply couldn't recall? It can be hard to design for users who can identify that there's an issue but may not be able to specify what that particular issue is. We often get comments like "I don't know how you could fix it, it just seems complicated" or "if I can't find what I'm looking for I just Google it". If you find yourself hearing these comments frequently, you may benefit from the 'Fly on the Wall' technique. This lightening talk will briefly highlight how I used passive observation of user behavior through heatmapping and user session video replay to identify pain points, boost conversions, and optimize your site. You will leave the talk with the knowledge to utilize this same technique and apply it to your own future projects.

15m

Salon D

Lia D. McCabe

Lia D. McCabe is a User Experience Researcher at the American College of Cardiology, where she assists in creating more effective user experiences for cardiologists and patients worldwide. She has her Master’s Degree specialization in Human Factors from Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University where she graduated with distinction and has worked as a UX Designer/Researcher for the […]

Career Shifting Strategies

It doesn't matter your background or where you are in your career. There is a job for everyone in UX. But how do you find the right one? How do you define your goals? How can you secure the best fit? This 5 minute talk is chalk full of resources, and strategies I have used to make my career pivot! Combing a professional development course I took with Streetwise partners and Design Thinking methods. I have collected some of my favorite tools and tips to share with everyone. Including the following: 1. SMART GOALS - (define what you want) 2. Informational Interviews (do you research, have a goal in mind, have an action item at the end.) 3. Road mapping and tracking your networking (Trello board) 4. How to use Slack Community Channels (AIGA, women who code, color coded etc) 5. Use LinkedIn better (what is the story you want to tell, reach out to people with your pitch and refer a friend.) 6. Clutch.co (B2B directory to discover what companies are really doing) At the end of the talk I will make my slides available on Linkedin's share slide so everyone will have access to all the resources I will list.

15m

Salon D

Marie Claire Andrea

I love designing tools, stories and experiences with help business thrive and empower people. I am a Native Washington, toddler mom, and lover of coffee! I am currently a member of the Creative Junkfood collective as well as a community organizer for 1 Million Cups DC.

Lemons that Made Lemonade: Positive Outcomes from Negative Experiences

45m

Salon A-C

Dian Holton

Dian Holton is senior deputy art director at AARP Media and a freelance window display associate for the GAP. Her background includes publishing (print/digital), integrated marketing, branding, retail installation, styling and footwear design. She currently serves on the AIGA Washington DC chapter board as the Strategic Initiatives chair. Her passions include education, philanthropy, fashion and […]

Dan Klyn

Dan Klyn teaches information architecture at the University of Michigan School of Information, is co-founder of World Information Architecture Day, past President of the Information Architecture Institute, and is a founding member of the faculty and scientific board of advisers at the Building Beauty post-graduate architecture program in Sorrento, Italy. In 2008 he co-founded The […]

https://good-fit.org
Alex Leitch

Alex Leitch holds an M.Des. from OCAD University in Toronto and a combined honours B.A. from McMaster University in Fine Art/Critical Theory. Their work focuses on interaction design in game and information systems, and has been exhibited at multiple Galleries and installation festivals. Alex has served as technical lead or senior software developer with a […]

Heather Gay

Heather Gay is the Vice President of User Experience Research at Mediabarn in Arlington, VA and has been supporting her clients’ work there for a decade.  She brings nearly 25 years of research management experience to her projects and has a special ability to look at a situation through the eyes of the user.  Her enthusiasm, coupled […]

PRESENTERS

Day 1: Workshops

 

Jimmy Chandler
plus

Jimmy Chandler

Flatiron School

Carol Smith
plus

Carol Smith

Carnegie Mellon University

Natalie Levy-Costa
plus

Natalie Levy-Costa

USA TODAY Network

Carrie Hane
plus

Carrie Hane

Tanzen LLC

Nathan Curtis
plus

Nathan Curtis

EightShapes, LLC

David Farkas
plus

David Farkas

EPAM

Day 1: Poster

 

Carrie Hane
plus

Carrie Hane

Tanzen LLC

Daphne Bourne
plus

Daphne Bourne

Capital One

Dina Lewis
plus

Dina Lewis

Distilled Logic

Elizabeth Nichols
plus

Elizabeth Nichols

Usability Lab at U.S. Census Bureau

Fletcher Maffett
plus

Fletcher Maffett

USA TODAY NETWORK | GANNETT

Illee Ipanag
plus

Illee Ipanag

The Motley Fool

Jacqui Olkin
plus

Jacqui Olkin

Olkin Comms. Consulting

Janel Kiley
plus

Janel Kiley

USA TODAY Network | Gannett

Jason Wishard
plus

Jason Wishard

Capital One

Jeffrey Ryan Pass
plus

Jeffrey Ryan Pass

Booz Allen Hamilton

Jibril Jaha
plus

Jibril Jaha

Lambda School

Jordan Higgins
plus

Jordan Higgins

U. Group

Kate Thacker
plus

Kate Thacker

USA TODAY Network | Gannett

Lisa D. Dance
plus

Lisa D. Dance

ServiceEase

Marianne Epstein
plus

Marianne Epstein

USA TODAY Network | Gannett

Patrick Slawinski
plus

Patrick Slawinski

USA TODAY Network | Gannett

Rajeev Subramanian
plus

Rajeev Subramanian

AvalonBay Communities

Sarah Dixon
plus

Sarah Dixon

National Geographic

Tony Fugolo
plus

Tony Fugolo

EPAM Systems

Day 2: Talks

 

Kasey Jean
plus

Kasey Jean

Designlab

Michael McDermott
plus

Michael McDermott

George Mason University

Adam Motiwala
plus

Adam Motiwala

Fifth Tribe

Sruti Vijaykumar
plus

Sruti Vijaykumar

UserWorks

Michael Owens
plus

Michael Owens

Design for Context

Lia D. McCabe
plus

Lia D. McCabe

ACC

Marie Claire Andrea
plus

Marie Claire Andrea

Social Tables

Swetha Suresh
plus

Swetha Suresh

NGP VAN

Alba Villamil
plus

Alba Villamil

Independent

Vidhika Bansal
plus

Vidhika Bansal

CARFAX

Milena Rodban
plus

Milena Rodban

Independent - private practice

Andrew Miller
plus

Andrew Miller

Amazon

Lindsey Dragun
plus

Lindsey Dragun

n/a

Kelly Tsao
plus

Kelly Tsao

Fjord

Cathy Pages
plus

Cathy Pages

USA Today Network

Jenka Gurfinkel
plus

Jenka Gurfinkel

athenahealth

Rhoni Rakos
plus

Rhoni Rakos

ASHA

Stephanie M. Pratt
plus

Stephanie M. Pratt

GoCanvas

Coleman Collins
plus

Coleman Collins

IonQ

Neha Kale
plus

Neha Kale

UserWorks, Inc.

Sid Barcelona
plus

Sid Barcelona

Threespot

Jayne Thomas
plus

Jayne Thomas

EPAM

Michaela Kerem
plus

Michaela Kerem

JHU/APL

Rachael Pollack
plus

Rachael Pollack

LookThink

Christopher Montwill
plus

Christopher Montwill

Threespot

Joi Coleman
plus

Joi Coleman

Booz Allen Hamilton

Faris Bouzid
plus

Faris Bouzid

The Voice Engineering Club

Ron Polka, Jr.
plus

Ron Polka, Jr.

Hilton

Jean E. Fox
plus

Jean E. Fox

US Bureau of Labor Statistics

JD Jones
plus

JD Jones

Modus Create

Mark Becker
plus

Mark Becker

UserWorks, Inc.

Nick Weinel
plus

Nick Weinel

UserWorks, Inc.

Lashanda Hodge
plus

Lashanda Hodge

EPAM

Robin Kaplan
plus

Robin Kaplan

Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS)

Expert Panelists

 

Heather Gay
plus

Heather Gay

Mediabarn

Alex Leitch
plus

Alex Leitch

UMD College Park

Dan Klyn
plus

Dan Klyn

UMich School of Info

Dian Holton
plus

Dian Holton

AARP Media

REGISTER

Group pricing availiable- contact [email protected]

REGISTER NOW

PRICING

Please note: All options with full day workshop or 2 half-day workshops, lunch will be provided.

Pricing tables provided for:

  • Package Pricing
  • Single Day Event Pricing
  • Student Pricing

VALUE PROPOSITION

Need some help convincing your leadership to sponsor your attendance at DCUX? Download this DCUX ROI letter from the board of the DC chapter of the User Experience Professionals Association, which highlights the value proposition of attending, and include it in your pitch.

Package Pricing

Packages bundle Friday workshop selections, access to the evening showcase reception, and Saturday’s Conference programming and include a discount for your commitment to both days!

Ticket Type Early Bird
ends 8/31/2019
Price
thru 11/7/2019
On-Site Rate
11/8/2019
1 Half-Day Workshop + Conference $415 $490 $515
2 Half-Day Workshops + Conference $565 $640 $665
1 Full Day Workshop + Conference $565 $640 $665

Single Day Event Pricing

Can’t make it to both days, or only part of Friday? Single event pricing gives you flexibility to only pay for what you can make it to.

Ticket Type Early Bird
ends 8/31/2019
Price
thru 11/7/2019
On-Site Rate
11/8/2019
Conference only $275 $350 $375
Full Day Workshop only $320 $320 $320
Half-Day Workshop only $160 $160 $160

Student Pricing

DCUX is pleased to offer current students discounted pricing! Please note: Student status will be validated before registration is completed.

Ticket Type Early Bird
ends 8/31/2019
Price
thru 11/7/2019
On-Site Rate
11/8/2019
1 Half-Day Workshop + Conference $265 $265 $265
2 Half-Day Workshops + Conference $415 $415 $415
1 Full Day Workshop + Conference $415 $415 $415
Conference only $125 $125 $125
Full Day Workshop only $320 $320 $320
Half-Day Workshop only $160 $160 $160

GROUP DISCOUNTS

Groups of 3 or more receive 10% off when registering for the full conference at the standard rate of $350, as part of the same order. Enter code GROUP10 during registration to take advantage of this discount. For larger groups of 10 or more please contact us for assistance at [email protected]

TRANSFERS, REFUNDS, AND CANCELLATIONS

Registrations are transferable; email us ASAP to let us know who will be taking your place. Last day to request a refund is October 4, 2019.  All requests for registration cancellations and refunds should be submitted in writing to: [email protected] or fax: 301-542-0049. All refunds will be subjected to a $50 cancellation fee. Refunds will be issued in the same manner in which payment was made and may take up to 3 weeks after the summit. No refunds will be granted after this date and no-shows will not be eligible for refunds

PAYMENT INFORMATION

We accept American Express, MasterCard, Visa and Paypal (we’ll need your credit card’s correct billing address to process the charge). We also can bill via invoice, but full payment will be due upon receipt of the invoice.

TERMS OF SERVICE

SPEAKER OR WORKSHOP LEADER CANCELLATIONS

We do our best to deliver a relevant and meaningful conference experience. Should an advertised speaker or workshop leader be unable to attend due to illness or other factors beyond the control of DCUX, we reserve the right to make the best possible substitution that meets our standards.

CODE OF CONDUCT

We’re dedicated to providing a safe, harassment-free conference experience for all participants—regardless of gender, sexual orientation, disability, physical appearance, race, age or religion. Read more.

SPONSORS

We’re thrilled to announce that the following organizations have pitched in to support DCUX 2019 as event sponsors. We are grateful for their support and excited to introduce you to them, if you don’t know them already:

Gold Level:

Silver Level:

Bronze Level:

Other:

We’d love nothing more than to connect you with the ever-growing DC Design Community made up of the students, practitioners, leaders at DCUX 2019 .

Contact us for details on how we can help you get the most out of your sponsorship!

Download the DCUX Prospectus 2019. (pdf)

BOOK SIGNAGE

 

 

CODE OF CONDUCT

Your DCUX organizers are committed to building a diverse, open, inclusive, accessible and harassment-free community across all our events in person or online. We enthusiastically welcome new people, views, and perspectives while fostering long-lasting relationships that earn your participation year after year. In support of this commitment, engagement with the DCUX Conference is grounded in your agreement to the following Code of Conduct for all interactions- during the event, on social media and any form of digital media.

We welcome your feedback and will be continuously revising this living document with your suggestions, concerns, and comments. Thank you for working with us to make this a safe, enjoyable, and welcoming experience for everyone who participates however they participate. Send any thoughts regarding this Code of Conduct or Event Safety to [email protected].

  • Be respectful and courteous to your fellow participants. You may have a wonderful rapport with another online, but should still ask permission to engage in physical contact and respect the wishes and boundaries of others.
  • Be mindful of your interactions with others. Harassment, including: unwanted physical contact, photography or recording; sustained disruption of sessions and events; demeaning or discriminatory comments or behaviors; unwelcome sexual attention; deliberate intimidation; stalking- is not acceptable and should be reported to DCUX and/or UXPA DC leadership and to [email protected]. Remember, harassment is not about the intentions of your actions and words but on the impact they have on others.
  • Participants of DCUX are responsible for contributing to a safe environment for all. This includes speaking up for yourself and others as uncomfortable situations arise, encouraging good behavior with gentle reminders or physical support, and reporting harassment, ill treatment, and inappropriate behaviors experienced by you directly or witnessed occurring to others to UXDC and/or UXPA DC leadership.
  • Conference organizers may take any lawful action to reported incidents we deem appropriate, including but not limited to issuing warnings, removal of the offender from the conference or digital platform, or escalation to outside authorities.
UXPA DC

UXPA DC is the DMV chapter of the international User Experience Professionals Association (UXPA), and is dedicated to bringing innovative UX-related programming to its members and the larger DC community.

DCUX

DCUX is an expertly curated collection of the District’s UX, design, and creative news + events. Join the DCUX community on Facebook and Twitter!

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